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Full text of "NAEB Newsletter (February 20, 1933)"

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OFFICERS 

President: JOS. F. WRIGHT, WILL 




: W. I. GRIFFITH, WOI 


Secretary-Treasurer 

B. B. BRACKETT, KUSD 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 

Vermillion, South Dakota 


Office of Executive Secretary 
T. M. BEAIRD, WNAD 

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA 




College, ar\A LSv\\\Je.r / ^\\y 
"Br'cxsdealing 


February 20, 1933 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
First ZONE: DANIEL E. NOBLE, WCAC 

CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
STORRS, CONNECTICUT 

Second Zone: G. R. Faint, WJBU 
BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY 
Lewisburq, Pennsylvania 
THIRD ZONE: GARLAND POWELL, WRU F 
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 
Fourth Zone: H. G. INGHAM, KFKU 

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS 
LAWRENCE, KANSAS 

fifth ZONE: H. v. CARPENTER, KWSC 

STATE COLLEGE OF WASHINGTON 
Pullman, Washington 

At Large: R. C. HIGGY, WEAO 

Columbus, Ohio 


BULLETIN 

TO MEMBERS 
of 

THE ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY BROADC/STING STATIONS 


The attached article prepared by MR. MORSE SALISBURY, CHIEF 
OF RADIO SERVICE, UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, 
WASHINGTON, D. C., is the fourth of the series written es¬ 
pecially for members of the Association. Mr. Salisbury 
discusses educational broadcasting from 1928 to 1933. 



EDUCAT IONAL BROADCASTING, IN 1928-1933 
BY 

• Morse Salisbury, 

Chief of Radio Service, 

U. S, Department of Agriculture 

Of course, the catastrophic results of the 3-year collapse in the price 
structure overshadow everything else in the history of educational broadcasting 
during the past 5 years, like everything else in the history of all educational 
effort during that time. 

As the newest form of educational activity, and consequently the form 
with the least capital and personnel involved, broadcasting seems bound to 
suffer at least as much as any other branch of education in the inevitable 
retrenchment in education. 

That is the overwhelming fact before the thinking of all persons in¬ 
terested in educational broadcasting just now. It is difficult to recall 
again the picture of educational broadcasting 5 years ago when hopes surged 
high and the public prints teemed with glowing predictions. Once you do recon¬ 
struct the picture of educational broadcasting, in 1928, and compare it with 
the.broadcasting of the present, you realize how vain is prophecy, and how 
actually realized developments, though different, may be as beneficial as 
imagined developments. 

In 1933, gone are the perfervid dreams of a 10-million dollar radio 
university; exploded is the 1928 belief that radio had magical powers of educa¬ 
tion, We’re looking realistically at education by radio this year. I think 
that is clear gain. 1 think those of us who have come with radio education to 
the rock-bottom realities stand ready now to build something that will work and 
that will endure. We at least have learned that radio can’t perform many 
educational functions. You can’t give radio courses to all the people of a 
State that will compare in effective instruction value with courses given in 
residence to a few people,' You can’t expect the radio organization of a 
university or a college to do a good job unless you give it authority. Even if 





you give authority to the radio organization of a university or a college, you 
can’t expect it to do a good job in education unless you give it the editorial 
workers and production men and women and clerical help necessary to take the 
good radio talent of the faculty and assist that talent in preparing and pro¬ 
ducing and following up really educational programs. And you fan’t expect the 
good radio talent of the faculty to continue indefinitely piling more and more 
radio work on top of a full-time teaching or research program. Either they will 
rebel, or they will let down on the amount of time they give to preparing their 
radio material* These things, end more, we have learned. 

It seems to me that we stand ready now, after 5 years of int@ia&i%o, gruelling 
experience in the realities of presenting day-to-day educational radio programs, 
to develop educational broadcasting on an assured, common sense basis and scale. 

We no longer hope for miraculous millions to be poured into educational broad¬ 
casting. We realize that we shall have to work with small resources for some 
time to come. We realize that the radio unit must be in the hands of a strong 
member of the institutional faculty, strategically placed within the institutional 
organization, if it is to survive in-the inevitable competition among departments 
of instruction and administration for meager institutional funds during the next 
few years. We realize that permanent broadcasting programs depend on making pro¬ 
vision for faculty talent to prepare and present the program, and for expert radio 
educators to assist the faculty talent in preparation and presentation. We re¬ 
alize that the follow-up work of educational broadcasting must be adequately pro¬ 
vided for in the arrangements for clerical help, printing, and so on. 

Lately when I have talked -with educational broadcasters, they have talked 
practicalities like -these, rather than taking off on conversational flights into 
the realms of gaudy fancy about the future of educational broadcasting. That is 
a significant difference between now and 5 years ago* It augurs well for the 
next 5 years. 



OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT! JOS. F. WRIGHT, WILL 

URBANA, ILLINOIS 

Vice-Presidents W. I. GRIFFITH, WOI 



Secretary-Treasurer 

B. B. BRACKETT, KUSD 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH DAKOTA 
VERMILLION, SOUTH DAKOTA 


Office of Executive Secretary 
T. M. BEAIRD, WNAD 



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.^££1 <ali Ci K\^ 
of 


College end Umv/e/^ily 
"B/oedcelling 


Feoruary £ 0 , It?o3 
BULLETIN 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
FIRST ZONE! DAN 1 EL E. NOBLE, WCAC 

CONNECTICUT AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

SECOND ZONE! G. R. FAINT, WJ B U 

Lewisburq, Pennsylvania 

THIRD ZONE! GARLAND POWELL, WRUF 

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 

FOURTH ZONE! H. G. INGHAM, KFKU 


LAWRENCE, KANSAS 

FIFTH ZONE: H . V. CARPENTE R, KWSC 

STATE COLLEGE OF WASHINGTON 

AT Large: R. C. HIGGY, WEAO 

OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 


TO MEMBERS 
of 

TEE ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY BROADCASTING STATIONS 
(and educational officials cooperating with the Association) 


The attached article was written ffr the Association by DR. JOY 
ELMER MORGAN, EDITOR, THE JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL EDUCATION AS¬ 
SOCIATION, AMD CHAIRMAN, THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION BY 
RADIO. The article, entitled w Achievements of the National Com¬ 
mittee on Education by Radio,* 1 sets out the work of the National 
Committee since its organization in 1930. 

This is the third of a series prepared for the Association by 
men prominent in the field of radio work. 


Sincerely yours, 

''.- -f .M.i 

Executive Seci 




ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE NATIONAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION BY RADIO 


By J©y Elmer Morgan, Editor, The Journal of the 
National Education Association, and Chairman, The National 
Committee on Education by Radio 

The National Committee on Education by Radio was organized during the winter 
of 1930 when it mapped out a five-year program for the protection and development 
of this new field. Within two years, in spite of the depression and confusion in 
the national life, it has moved forward with remarkable effectiveness. Its 
achievements include the followings 

First, the Committee has made constant efforts to protect college and univer¬ 
sity broadcasting stations against powerful attacks by commercial interests. 
Se cond , by the maintenance of specific clearinghouse service to college and 
university broadcasting stations, the Committee has encouraged the development 
of educational broadcasting in such institutions. 

Thir d, the Committee has successfully discouraged the effort to establish 
radio advertising in the schools. Referring to the original intention of the 
commercial companies, Orrin E. Dunlap, Jr,, writing in the New York Times for 
February 5, 1933, admits n The idea that tooth paste, pencils, pons, candy, bread 
or motor cars can be advertised to schools under commercial sponsorship has been 
abandoned. Teachers will not telerate it,” 

Fourth, the Committee has sponsored a nationwide survey of educational broad* 
casting in the land-grant colleges and separate state universities. 

Fifth, thru its bulletin. Education by Radio, the Committee has gathered the 
greatest collection of writings which exists in this field. By spreading such 

information among people who occupy positions of power and influence it has sown 
4 l 

the seeds for the radio reform which is as inescapable as tomorrow's sun. Its 
influence in this direction was clearly evidenced in the action taken by the 
Dominion of Canada which has revised its radio system to provide for both dominion 
and provincial needs under public operation. 








2 . 


These five achievements have laid foundations for future years. The nation 
is now in a great period of transition. The public is beginning to assert its 
rights and to demand freedom from brutal commercial exploitation. Commercializ¬ 
ed radio is breaking, down and the public is losing interest. It is also beginning 
to show signs of hostility. It will mean everything to the future of radio that 
we have in our more progressive states, stations operating under educational 
auspice Si Next to consecrated teachers, these stations are today the most valuable 
educational assets of the states which have them. Let us strengthen and enlarge 
the pioneer activities of these stations at every point until they connect the 
entire educational resources of the state with every home and school in the state.